The Science Behind Why You Can’t Read in the Car

For many of us, carsickness is the bane of every automotive experience: It’s always there, preventing us from navigating with our phone or even reading a book to pass the time without the sudden onset of a headache, cold sweats, and crippling nausea. It’s like being hungover, but without the fun drinking part that precedes it.

What exactly is going on here? Why do some of us fall violently ill just by glancing at a book in a moving car, while others can read through an entire road trip without any problem at all? Here’s the scientific lowdown on what makes carsickness tick, as well as what you can do to prevent (or at least minimize) its wickedly brutal effects.

The Motion Sickness Mystery

These days, the prevailing belief is that motion sickness arises from a disagreement between your eyes’ visual input and your inner ear’s sense of acceleration and/or movement. For instance, if you’re in a plane that starts to bank sharply to the left, your inner ear tells you you’re moving even though your eyes tell you you’re clearly sitting still in your seat. The same holds true for reading a book in a car, and anyone who’s ever gotten motion sickness in a movie theater knows the opposite can be just as uncomfortable.

It’s not that simple, though (why would it be?): The scientific community still isn’t 100-percent convinced that sensory disagreement alone is responsible for the motion sickness people experience in cars (or boats, or planes), nor are they sure why nearly one third of us are more sensitive to it than others, or why women seem to get it more than men — there simply isn’t a consensus, and since nobody’s funneling millions of dollars into motion sickness research, definitive answers don’t seem close at hand.

Toddler Looks Delighted As Firefighters Try To Free Him From Locked Car

Firefighters in Cornwall, England rescued a 14-month-old from a car he had locked himself inside of on Friday.

The best part? The toddler looks delighted by the entire situation.

Kirsty Green, 27, left her son Brandon in the backseat of her car to load her recently purchased groceries into the trunk, per Metro. However, she accidentally left her car keys in the trunk along with the groceries.

Before she could get into her car to pop the trunk and retrieve her keys, Brandon activated the car’s central locking system, shutting himself in.

Green began to panic, and staff from the grocery store called for rescue.

A crew from Bude Community Fire Station soon showed up and attempted to free the toddler from the car using hand tools. But when a crew member noticed a two-pence coin in Brandon’s mouth, they decided to take quicker action, per the Independent.

Firefighters smashed a rear window, climbed through and returned the boy to his mother, uninjured.

Despite the stressful ordeal, Green seems to have taken a cue from her son and has a good sense of humor about the whole thing.

Xiaomi’s latest all- rounder budget phone knocks it out of the park

Just about every segment of the travel industry is rife with rip-offs, but the folks who rent cars have risen gouging to an art form. The worst rip-offs are the extras that you often need for your trip and can’t obtain through alternative sources. Other bad ones include unconscionably high prices for options that you can avoid and various fees that are added onto base rates rather than included as they should be.

Fortunately, there are work-arounds that will allow you to bypass most of these rip-offs. But you have to be careful — car-rental providers want to overcharge you whenever they can. Here are seven ways to beat them at their own game.

Overpriced Insurance

Is rental-car collision insurance overpriced? Yes. Here’s how much: A car-rental company once informed travel agents that it could offer clients an unbeatable rate — $0 per day — provided only that the clients bought insurance.

Even though rental companies sometimes call their policies “insurance,” technically, they’re not. The policy is really a waiver of the company’s right to collect damages from you if you damage the rental. By whatever name, however, the price is outrageously high, at up to $30 per day in many cases. You know it’s overpriced when you can buy equivalent coverage from third-party sources — proprietors that make a profit — for less than $10 per day or get it free through your credit card.

Work-Around: Your regular auto insurance may cover you in a rented car, at least within the U.S., although many such policies do not pay for the full list of charges that rental companies add to a collision bill. You’re better off using the free coverage automatically provided on rentals charged to most AmEx, Diners Club, Discover, and Visa credit (not debit) cards, and many MasterCards. Except for Diners Club, however, most credit-card coverage is secondary for rentals in the U.S., which means you’ll first have to make your claim via your regular insurance; to avoid this situation, you can buy less expensive third-party collision coverage from the big online travel agencies (OTAs) such as Expedia and Priceline or independent sellers such as Protect Your Bubble, or you can convert your AmEx coverage to primary for about $25 per rental.

Fueling Gouges

Most rental companies give you three options for fuel: (1) Buy a full tank when you rent the car, (2) have the rental company refuel it when you return it, or (3) return it with a full tank. The first two options are complete rip-offs.

When you buy the full tank, the price may be close to the going rates locally, but that’s not the gouge. The gouge is that you get no credit for whatever fuel remains in the tank when you return the car. Instead, you donate it to the rental company. So unless Avis, Hertz, or Enterprise is your favorite charity, this option is a nonstarter.

When a rental company fills the car, it typically charges two to three times the local price per gallon (or liter). Last month, a reader reported being asked to pay €368 (about $500) to fill a tank that was at the three-quarters mark when returned. The reader assumed this was some sort of misprint, but the agent wouldn’t budge. (The reader got back in the car and drove to a gas station for a fill.)

Work-Around: The obvious work-around is to take the third option and fill up the tank just before you return the car. This means checking out available filling stations near the airport when you first rent your car so you’ll know where to get a refill. Be sure to get a receipt to prove that you filled the tank.

Pirate Bay founder: We’ve lost the internet, it’s all about damage control now

At its inception, the internet was a beautifully idealistic and equal place. But the world sucks and we’ve continuously made it more and more centralized, taking power away from users and handing it over to big companies. And the worst thing is that we can’t fix it — we can only make it slightly less awful.

Let your imagination go wild. Try to pose dilemmas with equally good, or equally bad, alternatives, and make the other person’s decision really difficult. They can be realistic or fantastic, sober or outlandish.

2. Twenty questions

One person thinks of something; the other person can only ask yes/no questions to deduce what it is.

First person says a line, and then second person has to come up with a rhyming line. You can make it harder by specifying a meter.

Roadtrip bingo

Before you leave, make a stack of different bingo sheets, with each square being something you might reasonably expect to see on a road trip. You can have themes like road signs, license plate states, chain restaurants, or geographical features. Make sure each sheet has a different configuration.

If the car has an automatic transmission, use the driver’s right hand and the passenger’s left. Don’t crash the car!

Madlibs

These were popular when I was a kid, but I haven’t seen them lately. You can buy the booklets very cheaply.

Pick something you know very well by heart, like the alphabet or the pledge of allegiance, and try to say the words in reverse order. Go for accuracy then speed. It’s challenging! “All for justice and liberty with, indivisible, God under, nation one, stands it which for republic the to and, America of States United the of flag the to allegiance pledge I.”

Scattergories

You don’t need to buy the official board game. Just choose a category and a letter, and see who can come up with the most things in the category that start with that letter. For example, you might choose “jobs beginning with M,” and come up with “maid, mason, mechanic, model…” Set a timer and keep score if you want.

Why Apple’s Push for Accuracy of Health Apps Is a Major Step in the Right Direction

It’s becoming increasingly easy to make a fitness and health tracking app these days. Don’t get me wrong — a killer mobile experience is a feat now that mobile users have surpassed those on desktop around the world. But frankly, the barrier to entry for mobile apps has been getting lower and lower over the past years. Today, we’ve arrived at an App Store chock full of healthcare apps (over 165k) — but the question remains: how many of these apps are actually legit?

Now, I’ll be the first to admit that Pokémon Go and its many alternatives don’t have a ton on the line in terms of accuracy or legitimacy. If they work and entertain, users are happy. But think about apps in the health space — fitness trackers, wellness monitors, medical diagnosis apps. If the rules and regulations for game apps are the same as those for health apps, there’s much more at stake — and much more room for serious danger to occur if these apps aren’t actually accurate.

Fortunately, in an effort to prevent this exact possibility, Apple has updated their App Store Review Guidelines, and health apps are under much more pressure to produce apps that actually work. Now, apps that have potential to cause physical harm, provide inaccurate data or information that could misdiagnose users will be under far stricter scrutiny. For many so called health and fitness wearable manufacturers, this could be bad news — but for consumers everywhere, I strongly believe that Apple’s push for greater accuracy in health apps is a big move in the right direction. It’s just the first of a series of steps required to make health technology more accurate and add value to our lives in a greater way.

6 ‘Pokemon GO’ Tips for Playing at Night Without Getting Arrested or Stabbed

Pokémon Go, the augmented reality sensation swallowing the nation, makes few real demands of players, but those it does are simple: go outside, walk around, and discover various landmarks. That’s all well and good for folks that can wander about in the daylight, but things become infinitely trickier at night.

The problem is that not everyone has the luxury of seeing the sun on the regular, thanks to the likes of work and school, which leaves hours of Ash Ketchum cosplay to the dark. No reasonable person can be expected to catch them all while limiting themselves to, if I may borrow an entirely unrelated phrase from The Lion King, everything the light touches.

Which is why every self-respecting Pokémon master needs to keep these tips in mind when throwing down at night.

Don’t Skulk

This one’s a bit broad, but that’s because it applies in nearly every situation. It’s just that it applies doubly so at night. Skulking is never a good look, and attempting to hide the fact that you’re playing Pokémon Go is fine during certain hours — but those hours end when the stars come out or light pollution prevents the stars from coming out. And you’ll look way shadier doing it at night.

Avoid Closed Parks and Stores

Locations like Central Park are incredible for burgeoning trainers, but most places have set business hours that should be respected. Having three Pokéstops right next to each other is lovely, but not being arrested for loitering outside a church late at night is lovelier. See also: the aforementioned “don’t skulk.”

These 3 Women Created An App For All Your Emergency Shape-Up Needs

Because you just can’t underestimate the importance of a fresh cut.
Balancing school, work and being black can make it difficult to prioritize looking good. But three Howard alumnae and friends are making the efforts involved with being busy, black and well-kempt much simpler with an app providing on-demand barber service to your doorstep.

The HausCall app provides on-demand barber services to users’ doorsteps. Created by Morgan Winbush, Killian Lewis and Crystal Allen-Washington, the app offers users the ability to book an immediate appointment with a barber of their choosing or schedule one in advance.

“It’s homecoming at Howard. Every guy we know is trying to feel and look like Diddy,” Winbush, the Chief Marketing Officer told Vibe. “If you’re running or coming into town really late, and you had to go to #1000Bottles or whatever party is happening on Friday night, but you didn’t have enough time [to spare], you could use HausCall and a barber would come wherever you are to cut your hair and make sure you looked great.”

A soft launch of the app will take place in New York and Washington D.C. this June. If all goes well, it’ll be launching in Atlanta next fall.

Galaxy Note 8 is going to be missing a feature we’ve all been waiting for

The long-rumored Galaxy Note 8 may not feature an optical fingerprint reader after all. According to a new report from Korean publication Naver, Samsung has decided against installing a display-integrated biometric sensor on its next flagship smartphone, because the technology isn’t as secure as it hoped it would be.

“We made every effort to install a display-integrated fingerprint sensor on Galaxy Note 8, but we decided not to install it on this strategic phone due to various technical limitations such as security,” said an official on behalf of the company, later adding that it will continue to develop the scanner.

Apple’s believed to have found a way to perfect the technology

Those who’ve been following TechnoBuffalo closely for the past few months may recall that Samsung reportedly poured a lot of money into developing an in-screen fingerprint reader for the Galaxy S8, but was unable to achieve favorable results in time for mass production.

Apple, on the other hand, is believed to have found a way to perfect the technology and should debut it on board the upcoming iPhone 8, which, like the Galaxy Note 8, is expected to pack a sizeable edge-to-edge display, a dual-camera setup, and powerful internals. Nothing’s confirmed, though.

Dear Instagram, We Hate The Stupid Algorithm — Sincerely, Every User

It’s dumb, it’s wrong, it’s counterproductive, it’s rude, it’s frustrating, it’s confusing, it’s downright evil. All these things and a lot more can be said about a stupid algorithm created by really smart people.

That’s just it, the Instagram executives are too smart for their own good. They think they’re helping us and their financial bottom line at the same time by having the algorithm only show us what they think we want to see.

What they failed to remember is that the number one most functionally amazing technology ever created to tell Instagram with extreme accuracy what I want to see in chronological order is the follow button!

The follow button was masterfully crafted with 100 percent accuracy to show users only what they want to see in their feed.

The other aspect that these extremely book smart—but clearly not street smart—IG executives failed to realize when deciding what posts are most relevant to show us, based on our previous engagement with accounts, is that there’s lots of accounts that we’re forced to engage with for political reasons—like if my nephew, mother-in-law or co-worker posts something, I’m obligated to “like” it.

On the flip side of that, I’m never going to like an @anacheri photo because it’s too sexy and my wife would be infuriated, and I’m never going to comment on @danbilzerian’s exploits on his page in fear of getting in trouble as well.

But it obviously doesn’t mean that i don’t wanna see Ana and Dan’s posts just because I don’t engage with them. It’s far from that! I’m on Instagram to get a rush of endorphins to feel good, so I’d much rather see their entertaining content than my cousin’s dinner salad.

But with the way the algorithm works, I may never get those endorphins because it may push those pages way down in my feed or completely ignore them, all at the algorithm’s discretion.

Saving More Lives Means Modernizing Addiction Treatment

My work in addiction treatment has shown me just how important it is to continue to raise the bar on treatment methodology today. The 2017 National Rx Drug Abuse and Heroin Summit in Atlanta served to reinforce my belief that modernizing addiction treatment is the key factor in saving more lives from the deadly clutches of substance abuse and dependency. With new treatment approaches at the forefront of the industry today, I believe all of us in addiction treatment need to make a new commitment to creating a positive environment where those struggling with addiction can survive, thrive and find new life in recovery.

Finding Common Ground

The annual Rx Summit brings together professionals and advocates involved with addiction treatment and prevention to discuss the public health emergency known as addiction in this country. The summit was first established in 2012 and includes a collaboration between lawmakers, researchers, business owners, treatment providers and others impacted by the national drug abuse crisis. I attended the conference in April and was inspired by the advancements that have been made in addiction treatment. At the same time, the information presented served as a reminder there is much more work to do.

This year’s summit addressed numerous relevant topics surrounding addiction treatment today, including the rising opioid epidemic, prevention strategies and treatment enhancements. Featured speakers included Thomas E. Price, M.D., secretary for the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), Vice Admiral Vivek H. Murthy, M.D., then-current United States Surgeon General, and Francis Collins, M.D., Ph.D., director of the National Institutes of Health (NIH).