Apple Just Killed Off 2 Iconic Products, And People Are Super Sad

Apple’s iPod Nano and iPod Shuffle music players are sadly no more.

On Thursday, the California tech giant confirmed it had discontinued the production and sale of the two devices which its late founder Steve Jobs first launched in 2005.
Apple also revealed that it was “simplifying” its iPod Touch range to just two models, which now come with either 32GB or 128GB of storage.

The Nano and Shuffle were created as a cheaper alternative to the original iPod. They remain the preferred music players of many runners and cyclists due to their lightweight nature.

But with the rise of the music-playing iPhone, observers said it was only a matter of time before their demise. In response, people took to Twitter to pay tribute to their favorite devices:

Want Apple AirPods? Amazon has them with Prime shipping

‘Let’s build a single supercomputer that is smarter than all of humanity put together.’ While that sounds ominously similar to what a mad scientist in a fictional universe would say before unleashing a deadly robotic that destroys all humanity, that is exactly the ideal behind the advancement of artificial intelligence as we have come to call it. Technologists around the world have long fantasized about an artificial intelligence so powerful, that it is smarter than all of humanity combined.They have had romantic dreams about how an advancement of that caliber could forward the scientific advancement of the human race by several millennia, provided it doesn’t kill them first.

While such a negative utopia is still far from being realized

The development of artificial intelligence has officially commenced, the only question that remains is whether it will be humanity’s greatest achievement or its biggest mistake.

Artificial intelligence is a vast and expansive genre. Progress in this genre will obviously lead to massive changes in almost every faction of life, depending on how technology as we know it impacts it today. Most of the AI manufactured today can expertize in no more than one area of intelligence and nothing more. One such example is the AI chess bot that can beat any known human in its own game, but that’s basically all it can do. The artificial intelligence in these devices is limited to a single area of functioning. While this means that a multipurpose domestic robot with near-human intelligence is yet to be scientifically possible, the drawback also allows inventors to focus on the development of intelligence in a specific genre of impact and make significant changes to it. And as long as we are talking about AI and its impact on specific areas of human life, why not discuss when and how artificial intelligence can impact and transform the internet as we know it.

For a while, the concept of AI for the Internet seemed to be pretty much in the hands of giant powerhouses like Google and Facebook, each doing its best to monopolize the genre for profit. But lately, smaller organizations with none of the funds have come up with revolutionary ideas on how to improve the web using artificial intelligence.

Artificial Intelligence has already been creatively implemented in several ways across the internet to highlight content based on user-preference,  show targeted advertisements, predict and manipulate behavioral traits amongst users and even create and design high quality content in a breeze.

One of the most popular ways artificial intelligence has found use on the internet is via its ability to intelligently target visitors based on their behavioral patterns and use the data thus collected to supply them with content recommendations. Cybernetic giants like Google and Facebook have been known to adapt this technology quite welcomingly. Rankbrain, the revolutionary new algorithm from Google, makes use of artificial intelligence to process unique search engine queries and supply users with customized results. AdWords, Google’s advertisement counterpart, makes heavy use of artificial intelligence to target visitors on the web and supply them with tethered advertisements customized according to their behavioral patterns. As for Facebook, Mark Zuckerberg has made quite a sensation these days after announcing that Facebook will be using AI to sort items in its news feed. Apart from these, several content developers such as Netflix and Amazon Cloud have adapted similar artificial intelligence technologies to target users and provide them with a selective assortment of relevant content based on their browsing history.

Rankbrain, the revolutionary new algorithm from Google, makes use of artificial intelligence to process unique search engine queries and supply users with customized results. AdWords, Google’s advertisement counterpart, makes heavy use of artificial intelligence to target visitors on the web and supply them with tethered advertisements customized according to their behavioral patterns. As for Facebook, Mark Zuckerberg has made quite a sensation these days after announcing that Facebook will be using AI to sort items in its news feed. Apart from these, several content developers such as Netflix and Amazon Cloud have adapted similar artificial intelligence technologies to target users and provide them with a selective assortment of relevant content based on their browsing history.

Why Apple’s Push for Accuracy of Health Apps Is a Major Step in the Right Direction

It’s becoming increasingly easy to make a fitness and health tracking app these days. Don’t get me wrong — a killer mobile experience is a feat now that mobile users have surpassed those on desktop around the world. But frankly, the barrier to entry for mobile apps has been getting lower and lower over the past years. Today, we’ve arrived at an App Store chock full of healthcare apps (over 165k) — but the question remains: how many of these apps are actually legit?

Now, I’ll be the first to admit that Pokémon Go and its many alternatives don’t have a ton on the line in terms of accuracy or legitimacy. If they work and entertain, users are happy. But think about apps in the health space — fitness trackers, wellness monitors, medical diagnosis apps. If the rules and regulations for game apps are the same as those for health apps, there’s much more at stake — and much more room for serious danger to occur if these apps aren’t actually accurate.

Fortunately, in an effort to prevent this exact possibility, Apple has updated their App Store Review Guidelines, and health apps are under much more pressure to produce apps that actually work. Now, apps that have potential to cause physical harm, provide inaccurate data or information that could misdiagnose users will be under far stricter scrutiny. For many so called health and fitness wearable manufacturers, this could be bad news — but for consumers everywhere, I strongly believe that Apple’s push for greater accuracy in health apps is a big move in the right direction. It’s just the first of a series of steps required to make health technology more accurate and add value to our lives in a greater way.

Galaxy Note 8 is going to be missing a feature we’ve all been waiting for

The long-rumored Galaxy Note 8 may not feature an optical fingerprint reader after all. According to a new report from Korean publication Naver, Samsung has decided against installing a display-integrated biometric sensor on its next flagship smartphone, because the technology isn’t as secure as it hoped it would be.

“We made every effort to install a display-integrated fingerprint sensor on Galaxy Note 8, but we decided not to install it on this strategic phone due to various technical limitations such as security,” said an official on behalf of the company, later adding that it will continue to develop the scanner.

Apple’s believed to have found a way to perfect the technology

Those who’ve been following TechnoBuffalo closely for the past few months may recall that Samsung reportedly poured a lot of money into developing an in-screen fingerprint reader for the Galaxy S8, but was unable to achieve favorable results in time for mass production.

Apple, on the other hand, is believed to have found a way to perfect the technology and should debut it on board the upcoming iPhone 8, which, like the Galaxy Note 8, is expected to pack a sizeable edge-to-edge display, a dual-camera setup, and powerful internals. Nothing’s confirmed, though.