20 Reasons Why I Don’t Like Your Instagram Post

1. I don’t like it because you don’t follow me back.

2. I don’t like it because you don’t like my posts.

3. I don’t like it because it doesn’t have 11 likes yet.

4. I don’t like it because I don’t want you to know that I’m creeping on your shit at 4 a.m.

5. I don’t like it because I don’t want you to know that I’m spending my Friday night on Instagram.

6. I don’t like it because your humble brag isn’t humble.

7. I don’t like it because your post is 100-percent self-serving.

8. I don’t like it because I’m jealous of your body.

9. I don’t like it because bae wouldn’t like it if I did.

10. I don’t like it because it’s a happy birthday post for someone I don’t know.

11. I don’t like it because I follow too many NYC food blogs to even notice it.

12. I don’t like it because I’m driving and that’s how people get killed.

13. I don’t like it because I can’t double tap the screen without putting down my pizza.

14. I don’t like it because we slept together a few weeks back. Better to lay low for now.

15. I don’t like it because I liked your last 3 posts and now I’ve got to play hard to get.

Unpacking Pinterest’s $150M Series Whatever

Recently I spent a few weeks in California, partly for work but mostly intended for rest and relaxation and to celebrate my brother’s 50th birthday. Throughout life, one of my absolutely most favorite activities has been meeting new people. To me, the world is a massive library and each person is a charming book waiting to be encountered, selected, read, understood and shared. Everyone has a story to tell and a lesson to impart, if you’re willing to listen and unguarded enough to travel beyond the surface and sometimes superficial introductions.

I met many cool, complex, and kind people during this short trip, most of them leaving a unique lasting impression. But what I was greatly fascinated by was the way some special souls were like a breath of fresh air, having the ability to dance to the deepest aspects of our emotional and rational dimensions while others were like irritating intruders that were part of the environment, yet made no effort to connect or positively interact.

Being socially intelligent, or a master at Social Salsa as I like to call it, may be natural to some, but the good news is that the behaviors associated with leaving a likable impression can be identified, measured and learned — so it’s less about personality and more about a choice to put an effort into being a pleasant person that others enjoy being around and miss when absent.

So what are some of the traits of people who have a healthy level of self-awareness, ‘get’ others and dance into our hearts? Here are the most central Social Salsa steps:

• You may have just met them, but through their initial interaction, they give you the impression that you’ve known them for years because they’re open and engaging and share aspects of their life openly and without reservation.

• They aren’t afraid to initiate conversation.

• They don’t strike a pose in the corner, acting aloof and unapproachable.

• They’re as curious about you as you are about them.

• When in conversation, they listen with an open mind and heart, without interrupting.

• They remember details shared and will ask/follow up when you next see them.

• It’s not only about them — they give you a space to carve out and share who you are.

• They’re dependable and genuine.

• They’re secure and confident.

• They laugh with you, not at you.

• They may use sarcasms but in a witty way, not in a whipping way.

• They demonstrate compassion and empathy.

• They provide value to the group through their knowledge, experience or kindness.

• They are thorough, consistent and patient.

Buying a OnePlus 5 will require an invite, at least in India

From the simplest to understand perspective… the socially nimble company tasks its employees with “opening their listening ears,” and tapping into community intelligence (both the company’s and the employee’s communities), then acting on what they’ve learned. This can put you in a much better position than your competitors in two ways: 1) Getting a well-focused product to market much faster, and 2) Earning a higher level of marketplace trust and identification with your brand.

Everybody knows that the faster you can innovate and get things moving, the better — and every brand wants to build trust — but identifying and listening to social advocates is still not considered a “best practice” in much of the corporate world, much less empowering employees to take advantage of opportunities outside the company’s social community. Instead of looking at social advocacy from a “win-win” standpoint, brands would be much better served to adopt “learn-learn,” as their social philosophy.

Every business function depends on the quality of the human relationships needed to perform that function. The more we practice using social to learn more about who makes up our communities and how we can serve them better (at every level), the more in-tune we’ll be and the more harmony we can create both inside and outside our companies.

Want your brand to be more successful? Wrap social around every business practice. And while you’re doing so, ditch the win-win mentality, which denotes an ending — not a continuation. Embracing learn-learn increases the value of relationships for all parties.

Those who adapt to social engagement will drive more business and stay competitive—those who ignore it will not. #RonR

Lonely People Are Actually Wired Differently

The study, conducted at the University of Chicago and published in the online journal Cortext, looked at 38 people who considered themselves “very lonely” and 32 people who didn’t identify as lonely.

From there, researchers conducted something called a Stroop Test, which asks participants to focus first on the color of a word’s lettering rather than its meaning. This allows the meaning or impact of the word to be subconscious. The words fell into four categories: social and positive ( like “party”), nonsocial and negative (like “solitary”), nonsocial and positive (like “joy”) and social and negative (like “sad”).

During this test, an electrode of 128 sensors was placed on the participants’ heads to measure their brain waves for 480 milliseconds. For the first 280 milliseconds, lonely people’s brains responded in the same way to negative and nonsocial words. But after that point, their brains activated in the neural areas devoted to attention when shown socially negative words, whereas non-lonely people responded to both social and non-social negative words for the full 480 milliseconds.

In other words, lonely people focused on the negative while non-lonely people focused on everything.

Although this was a small study and more research needs to be done, researchers Stephanie and John Cacioppo and Stephen Balogh concluded that this subtle difference actually shows that lonely people’s intense response to a social threat over half a second is probably implicit.

Bernie Sanders: ‘I Am Delighted’ By Jeremy Corbyn’s Victory

U.S. Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.) hailed the election of Jeremy Corbyn to the leadership of the United Kingdom’s Labour Party as a promising development in the global fight against inequality. 

“At a time of mass income and wealth inequality throughout the world, I am delighted to see that the British Labour Party has elected Jeremy Corbyn as its new leader,” Sanders, a Democratic presidential candidate, said in a statement emailed to The Huffington Post Saturday. “We need leadership in every country in the world which tells the billionaire class that they cannot have it all. We need economies that work for working families, not just the people on top.”

Sanders’ appreciation of Corbyn is mutual. A week before his victory, Corbyn said he was following Sanders’ campaign with “great interest.”

Corbyn’s upset election as head of Labour, which makes him the de facto opposition leader in the U.K. parliament, has drawn comparisons to Sanders’ rise in the American political landscape. Like Corbyn, Sanders has achieved unexpected popularity by proposing dramatic solutions to end income inequality and reform the political process. The two left-leaning legislators also share an unglamorous demeanor.